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GCSE History

Mathematics - Year 7

Click here to return to our History curriculum home page

Below you will find more specific information about the curriculum in History for students who have chosen this subject for GCSE, explaining to you what students will learn, when, why and how. There is also information about how parents/carers are able to support students in their learning, extra-curricular opportunities in this subject and how it links to other subjects and the wider world.

Subject Key Concepts

#1 Cause and Consequence        

#2 Change and Continuity         

#3 Evaluating Evidence/Interpretations 

#4 Making supported judgements       

#5 Historical perspective –
the big picture


Please click here for Subject Key Concepts.

Please click here for PDF History Learning Journey

 Curriculum Overview for the year

Subject:      History                 Year: 10

Exam Board: AQA.

Options: America 1920-1973 & Conflict and Tension 1918-1939

Term

Topic / Key Concepts

Specific Knowledge

Specific Skills

Autumn

USA Unit 1 – American People and the Boom

·         The ‘Boom’: benefits, advertising and the consumer society; hire purchase; mass production, including Ford and the motor industry; inequalities of wealth; Republican government policies; stock market boom.

·         Social and cultural developments: entertainment, including cinema and jazz; the position of women in society, including flappers.

·         Divided society: organised crime, prohibition and their impact on society; the causes of racial tension, the experiences of immigrants and the impact of immigration; the Ku Klux Klan; the Red Scare and the significance of the Sacco and Vanzetti case.

Key concepts: Continuity, change, cause, consequence, significance, similarity and difference.

 

Key topic concepts: Economy, prosperity, credit, immigration, industry, discrimination, Democrat, Republican, culture, flappers, prohibition, crime, racial tension.

·         Develop and extend knowledge and understanding of specified key events, periods and societies in America 1920-1973.

·         Engage in historical enquiry to develop as independent learners and as critical and reflective thinkers.

·         Develop the ability to ask relevant questions about the past and to investigate issues critically.

·         Develop an awareness of why people, events and developments have been accorded historical significance and how and why different interpretations have been constructed about them.

·         Organise and communicate their historical knowledge and understanding in different ways and reach substantiated conclusions.

·         AO1: demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the key features and characteristics of the period studied.

·         AO2: explain and analyse historical events and periods studied using second-order historical concepts.

·         AO4: analyse, evaluate and make substantiated judgements about interpretations (including how and why interpretations may differ) in the context of historical events studied

USA Unit 2 – Americans’ experience of the Depression and the New Deal

·         American society during the Depression: unemployment; farmers; businessmen; Hoover’s responses and unpopularity; Roosevelt's election as president.

·         The effectiveness of the New Deal on different groups in society: successes and limitations including opposition towards the New Deal from Supreme Court, Republicans and Radical politicians; Roosevelt's contribution as president; popular culture.

·         The impact of the Second World War: America’s economic recovery; Lend Lease; exports; social developments, including experiences of African-Americans and women.

Key concepts: Continuity, change, cause, consequence, significance, similarity and difference

 

Key topic concepts: Economic crash, laissez-faire, election,  reform, Supreme Court, culture, war, recovery, discrimination, equality

 

 

·         Develop and extend knowledge and understanding of specified key events, periods and societies in America 1920-1973.

·         Engage in historical enquiry to develop as independent learners and as critical and reflective thinkers.

·         Develop the ability to ask relevant questions about the past and to investigate issues critically.

·         Develop an awareness of why people, events and developments have been accorded historical significance and how and why different interpretations have been constructed about them.

·         Organise and communicate their historical knowledge and understanding in different ways and reach substantiated conclusions.

·         AO1: demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the key features and characteristics of the period studied.

·         AO2: explain and analyse historical events and periods studied using second-order historical concepts.

·         AO4: analyse, evaluate and make substantiated judgements about interpretations (including how and why interpretations may differ) in the context of historical events studied

Spring

USA Unit 3 – Post War America

·         Post-war American society and economy: consumerism and the causes of prosperity; the American Dream; McCarthyism; popular culture, including Rock and Roll and television.

·         Racial tension and developments in the Civil Rights campaigns in the 1950s and 1960s: Segregation laws; Martin Luther King and peaceful protests; Malcolm X and the Black Power Movement; Civil Rights Acts of 1964 and 1968.

·         America and the ‘Great Society': the social policies of Presidents Kennedy and Johnson relating to poverty, education and health; the development and impact of feminist movements in the 1960s and early 1970s, including the fight for equal pay; the National Organisation for Women, Roe v Wade (1973), the Supreme Court ruling on equal rights (1972) and opposition to Equal Rights Amendment.

Key concepts: Continuity, change, cause, consequence, significance, similarity and difference

 

Key topic concepts: Consumerism, Communism, McCarthyism, civil rights, voting, poverty, education, segregation, reform, feminism, equality.

 

·         Develop and extend knowledge and understanding of specified key events, periods and societies in America 1920-1973.

·         Engage in historical enquiry to develop as independent learners and as critical and reflective thinkers.

·         Develop the ability to ask relevant questions about the past and to investigate issues critically.

·         Develop an awareness of why people, events and developments have been accorded historical significance and how and why different interpretations have been constructed about them.

·         Organise and communicate their historical knowledge and understanding in different ways and reach substantiated conclusions.

·         AO1: demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the key features and characteristics of the period studied.

·         AO2: explain and analyse historical events and periods studied using second-order historical concepts.

·         AO4: analyse, evaluate and make substantiated judgements about interpretations (including how and why interpretations may differ) in the context of historical events studied

Conflict and Tension Unit 1 – Peace-making

·         The armistice: aims of the peacemakers; Wilson and the Fourteen Points; Clemenceau and Lloyd George; the extent to which they achieved their aims.

·         The Versailles Settlement: Diktat; territorial changes; military restrictions; war guilt and reparations.

·         Impact of the treaty and wider settlement: reactions of the Allies; German objections; strengths and weaknesses of the settlement, including the problems faced by new states.+ other Treaties

Key concepts: Continuity, change, cause, consequence, significance, similarity and difference

 

Key topic concepts: Armistice, peace, economy, trade, Big Three, self-determination, revenge, treaty, reparations, War Guilt, Fourteen Points.

 

 

·         Develop and extend knowledge and understanding of specified key events during the inter-war period 1918-1939.

·         Engage in historical enquiry to develop as independent learners and as critical and reflective thinkers.

·         Develop the ability to ask relevant questions about the past and to investigate issues critically.

·         Develop an awareness of why people, events and developments have been accorded historical significance and how and why different interpretations have been constructed about them.

·         Organise and communicate their historical knowledge and understanding in different ways and reach substantiated conclusions.

·         AO1: demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the key features and characteristics of the period studied.

·         AO2: explain and analyse historical events and periods studied using second-order historical concepts.

·         AO3: analyse, evaluate and use sources (contemporary to the period) to make substantiated judgements, in the context of historical events studied.

Summer

Conflict and Tension Unit 2 – League of Nations

·         The League of Nations: its formation and covenant; organisation; membership and how it changed; the powers of the League; the work of the League's agencies; the contribution of the League to peace in the 1920s, including the successes and failures of the League, such as the Aaland Islands, Upper Silesia, Vilna, Corfu and Bulgaria.

·         Diplomacy outside the League: Locarno treaties and the Kellogg-Briand Pact.

·         The collapse of the League: the effects of the Depression; the Manchurian and Abyssinian crises and their consequences; the failure of the League to avert war in 1939.

Key concepts: Continuity, change, cause, consequence, significance, similarity and difference

 

Key topic concepts: Peace, sanctions, assembly/council, special commissions, humanitarian work, Depression, dictators, treaties, diplomacy.

·         Develop and extend knowledge and understanding of specified key events during the inter-war period 1918-1939.

·         Engage in historical enquiry to develop as independent learners and as critical and reflective thinkers.

·         Develop the ability to ask relevant questions about the past and to investigate issues critically.

·         Develop an awareness of why people, events and developments have been accorded historical significance and how and why different interpretations have been constructed about them.

·         Organise and communicate their historical knowledge and understanding in different ways and reach substantiated conclusions.

·         AO1: demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the key features and characteristics of the period studied.

·         AO2: explain and analyse historical events and periods studied using second-order historical concepts.

·         AO3: analyse, evaluate and use sources (contemporary to the period) to make substantiated judgements, in the context of historical events studied.

Conflict and Tension Unit 3 – The Origins and Outbreak of the Second World War

·         The development of tension: Hitler's aims and Allied reactions; the Dollfuss Affair; the Saar; German rearmament, including conscription; the Stresa Front; Anglo-German Naval Agreement.

·         Escalation of tension: remilitarisation of the Rhineland; Mussolini, the Axis and the Anti-Comintern Pact; Anschluss; reasons for and against the policy of appeasement; the Sudeten Crisis and Munich; the ending of appeasement.

·         The outbreak of war: the occupation of Czechoslovakia; the role of the USSR and the Nazi-Soviet Pact; the invasion of Poland and outbreak of war, September 1939; responsibility for the outbreak of war, including that of key individuals: Hitler, Stalin and Chamberlain.

Key concepts: Continuity, change, cause, consequence, significance, similarity and difference

 

Key topic concepts: Foreign policy, Communism, Anschluss, treaties, appeasement, extremism/dictators, pact, occupation, remilitarisation, invasion, ultimatum.

 

NB: Students will start the Health unit if time allows (details on Y11 overview)

·         Develop and extend knowledge and understanding of specified key events during the inter-war period 1918-1939.

·         Engage in historical enquiry to develop as independent learners and as critical and reflective thinkers.

·         Develop the ability to ask relevant questions about the past and to investigate issues critically.

·         Develop an awareness of why people, events and developments have been accorded historical significance and how and why different interpretations have been constructed about them.

·         Organise and communicate their historical knowledge and understanding in different ways and reach substantiated conclusions.

·         AO1: demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the key features and characteristics of the period studied.

·         AO2: explain and analyse historical events and periods studied using second-order historical concepts.

·         AO3: analyse, evaluate and use sources (contemporary to the period) to make substantiated judgements, in the context of historical events studied.

Subject:      History                 Year: 11

Exam Board: AQA.

Options: Health and the People & Elizabethan England

Term

Topic / Key Concepts

Specific Knowledge

Specific Skills

Autumn

Health Unit 1 – Medicine Stands Still (medieval)

·         Medieval medicine: approaches including natural, supernatural, ideas of Hippocratic and Galenic methods and treatments; the medieval doctor; training, beliefs about cause of illness.

·         Medical progress: the contribution of Christianity to medical progress and treatment; hospitals; the nature and importance of Islamic medicine and surgery; surgery in medieval times, ideas and techniques.

·         Public health in the Middle Ages: towns and monasteries; the Black Death in Britain, beliefs about its causes, treatment and prevention.

Key concepts: Continuity, change, cause, consequence, significance, similarity and difference.

 

Key topic concepts: Knowledge, religion, observation, surgery, Four Humours, crusades, translation, public health, plague, pain.

 

Health Unit 2 – The Beginnings of Change (Renaissance)

·         The impact of the Renaissance on Britain: challenge to medical authority in anatomy, physiology and surgery; the work of Vesalius, Paré, William Harvey; opposition to change.

·         Dealing with disease: traditional and new methods of treatments; quackery; methods of treating disease; plague; the growth of hospitals; changes to the training and status of surgeons and physicians; the work of John Hunter.

·         Prevention of disease: inoculation; Edward Jenner, vaccination and opposition to change.

 

Key concepts: Continuity, change, cause, consequence, significance, similarity and difference.

 

Key topic concepts: Renaissance, enlightenment, knowledge, printing, communication, anaesthetic, inoculation, vaccination, surgery, disease, quackery, circulation, anatomy.

 

·         Develop and extend knowledge and understanding of specified key events, periods and societies concerning medicine through time c.1000-present day.

·         Engage in historical enquiry to develop as independent learners and as critical and reflective thinkers.

·         Develop the ability to ask relevant questions about the past and to investigate issues critically.

·         Develop an awareness of why people, events and developments have been accorded historical significance and how and why different interpretations have been constructed about them.

·         Organise and communicate their historical knowledge and understanding in different ways and reach substantiated conclusions.

·         AO1: demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the key features and characteristics of the period studied.

·         AO2: explain and analyse historical events and periods studied using second-order historical concepts.

·         AO3: analyse, evaluate and use sources (contemporary to the period) to make substantiated judgements, in the context of historical events studied.

Health Unit 3 – A Revolution in Medicine (Industrial period)

·         The development of Germ Theory and its impact on the treatment of disease in Britain: the importance of Pasteur, Robert Koch and microbe hunting; Pasteur and vaccination; Paul Ehrlich and magic bullets; everyday medical treatments and remedies.

·         A revolution in surgery: anaesthetics, including Simpson and chloroform; antiseptics, including Lister and carbolic acid; surgical procedures; aseptic surgery.

·         Improvements in public health: public health problems in industrial Britain; cholera epidemics; the role of public health reformers; local and national government involvement in public health improvement, including the 1848 and 1875 Public Health Acts.

Key concepts: Continuity, change, cause, consequence, significance, similarity and difference.

 

Key topic concepts: Bacteria, Germ Theory, bacteriologists, microbiologists, vaccination, magic bullets, surgery, anaesthesia, infection, aseptic and antiseptic surgery, public health, cholera, government reform.

 

Health Unit 4 – Modern Medicine

·         Modern treatment of disease: the development of the pharmaceutical industry; penicillin, its discovery by Fleming, its development; new diseases and treatments, antibiotic resistance; alternative treatments.

·         The impact of war and technology on surgery: plastic surgery; blood transfusions; X-rays; transplant surgery; modern surgical methods, including lasers, radiation therapy and keyhole surgery.

·         Modern public health: the importance of Booth, Rowntree, and the Boer War; the Liberal social reforms; the impact of two world wars on public health, poverty and housing; the Beveridge Report and the Welfare State; creation and development of the National Health Service; costs, choices and the issues of healthcare in the 21st century.

Key concepts: Continuity, change, cause, consequence, significance, similarity and difference.

 

Key topic concepts: antibiotics, drug-resistance, war, plastic surgery, social reformers, Liberal reforms, poverty, DNA, NHS, welfare state, transplants, blood transfusions, cancer, covid.

·         Develop and extend knowledge and understanding of specified key events, periods and societies concerning medicine through time c.1000-present day.

·         Engage in historical enquiry to develop as independent learners and as critical and reflective thinkers.

·         Develop the ability to ask relevant questions about the past and to investigate issues critically.

·         Develop an awareness of why people, events and developments have been accorded historical significance and how and why different interpretations have been constructed about them.

·         Organise and communicate their historical knowledge and understanding in different ways and reach substantiated conclusions.

·         AO1: demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the key features and characteristics of the period studied.

·         AO2: explain and analyse historical events and periods studied using second-order historical concepts.

·         AO3: analyse, evaluate and use sources (contemporary to the period) to make substantiated judgements, in the context of historical events studied.

Spring

NB: May still have the final part of the Health Course to finish off at beginning of Spring term.

 

Elizabeth Unit 1 – Court and Parliament

·         Elizabeth I and her court: background and character of Elizabeth I; court life, including patronage; key ministers.

·         The difficulties of a female ruler: relations with Parliament; the problem of marriage and the succession; the strength of Elizabeth’s authority at the end of her reign, including Essex’s rebellion in 1601.

Key concepts: Continuity, change, cause, consequence, significance, similarity and difference.

 

Key topic concepts: Court, Parliament, power, marriage, advisors, power, patronage, succession, authority, rebellion, reign, favour.

 

Elizabeth Unit 2 – Life in Elizabethan Times

·         A ‘Golden Age’: living standards and fashions; growing prosperity and the rise of the gentry; the Elizabethan theatre and its achievements; attitudes to the theatre.

·         The poor: reasons for the increase in poverty; attitudes and responses to poverty; the reasons for government action and the seriousness of the problem.

·         English sailors: Hawkins and Drake; circumnavigation 1577–1580, voyages and trade; the role of Raleigh.

Key concepts: Continuity, change, cause, consequence, significance, similarity and difference.

 

Key topic concepts: public health, poverty, culture, Great Chain of Being, theatre, propaganda, Puritans, deserving and undeserving poor, reform, exploration, privateering, treasure, knowledge, voyages, trade, empire.

·         Develop and extend knowledge and understanding of specified key events, periods and societies concerning Elizabethan England 1568-1603.

·         Engage in historical enquiry to develop as independent learners and as critical and reflective thinkers.

·         Develop the ability to ask relevant questions about the past and to investigate issues critically.

·         Develop an awareness of why people, events and developments have been accorded historical significance and how and why different interpretations have been constructed about them.

·         Organise and communicate their historical knowledge and understanding in different ways and reach substantiated conclusions.

·         AO1: demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the key features and characteristics of the period studied.

·         AO2: explain and analyse historical events and periods studied using second-order historical concepts.

·         AO4: analyse, evaluate and make substantiated judgements about interpretations (including how and why interpretations may differ) in the context of historical events studied

Elizabeth Unit 3 – Troubles at Home and Abroad

·         Religious matters: the question of religion, English Catholicism and Protestantism; the Northern Rebellion; Elizabeth's excommunication; the missionaries; Catholic plots and the threat to the Elizabethan settlement; the nature and ideas of the Puritans and Puritanism; Elizabeth and her government's responses and policies towards religious matters.

·         Mary Queen of Scots: background; Elizabeth and Parliament’s treatment of Mary; the challenge posed by Mary; plots; execution and its impact.

·         Conflict with Spain: reasons; events; naval warfare, including tactics and technology; the defeat of the Spanish Armada.

Key concepts: Continuity, change, cause, consequence, significance, similarity and difference.

 

Key topic concepts: Religion, Protestant, Catholic, Middle Way, Puritans, missionaries, execution, regicide, succession, rebellion, tactics, Armada.

·         AO1: demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the key features and characteristics of the period studied.

·         AO2: explain and analyse historical events and periods studied using second-order historical concepts.

·         AO4: analyse, evaluate and make substantiated judgements about interpretations (including how and why interpretations may differ) in the context of historical events studied

Summer (Half term only)

 

Elizabeth Unit 4 – Historic Environment

(The focus of this unit changes each year)

 

·         The study of the historic environment will focus on a particular site in its historical context and should examine the relationship between a specific place and associated historical events and developments.

 

·         2023 Examination = Sheffield Manor Lodge

·         2024 Examination = The Americas and Drake’s Circumnavigation

 

 

·         Students will be expected to answer a question that draws on second order concepts of change, continuity, causation and/or consequence, and to explore them in the context of the specified site and wider events and developments of the period studied.

·         Students should be able to identify key features of the specified site and understand their connection to the wider historical context of the specific historical period. Sites will also illuminate how people lived at the time, how they were governed and their beliefs and values.

·         Students will be expected to understand the ways in which key features and other aspects of the site are representative of the period studied. In order to do this, students will also need to be aware of how the key features and other aspects of the site have changed from earlier periods.

·         Students will also be expected to understand how key features and other aspects may have changed or stayed the same during the period.

·         AO1: demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the key features and characteristics of the period studied.

·         AO2: explain and analyse historical events and periods studied using second-order historical concepts.

Useful documents:

Please click here for a PDF of the Year 10 curriculum overview.

Please click here for a PDF of the Year 11 curriculum overview.

While this information covers a broad range of areas, please do get in touch with the Subject Leader Mrs Robertson if you have any questions.

Please click on the questions below to find out more.

Which exam board will students be examined by?

AQA

How are groups organised?

Students are taught in mixed ability groups and receive five one-hour lessons per fortnight.

What characteristics does a successful student have in this subject?

The most successful students in this subject will have an interest in how society, politics and the economy has changed over time and will be comfortable with analysing different interpretations of the past. Successful students will also have the ability to form rational arguments, supported with evidence, whilst they will also be able to write at length.

How will students’ learning be assessed at this level?

All topics are assessed at the end of Year 11, through two exams, each lasting 2 hours.

USA and Conflict and Tension make up Paper One, whilst Elizabeth and Health make up Paper Two.

There are a variety of question types across the two papers, with questions worth from 4 to 20 marks.

When do key assessments take place?

In-class assessment will run as follows:

  • USA: Sept-Jan Year 10
  • Conflict and Tension: Jan-July Year 10
  • Health: Sept-Jan Year 11
  • Elizabeth: Jan-May Year 11

The external exams will be at the end of Year 11.

How can parents/carers support students’ learning?

  • Encourage your child to re-visit their classwork at home and help them test their understanding of that information – e.g through quizzing them on key names/dates/events
  • Encourage your child to watch relevant programmes about our topics on TV/online – there are lots of programmes on BBC iPlayer as well as Youtube.
  • Encourage your child to access information on the internet as a way of enriching and consolidating their knowledge – e.g through using the BBC Bitesize website.
  • Encourage your child to spend quality time on their homework; the course is incredibly detailed and HW is essential.
  • Purchase revision guides that can be used at home and support your child in actively engaging with them – e.g completing some of the activities together
  • Check the quality of the work in your child’s exercise book and encourage them to make improvements where possible. 

What equipment do students need for this subject?

Essential basic equipment – pen, pencil, ruler, exercise book etc.

Textbooks for in-class activities

Access to SMHW

Access to Quizlet

How does this subject link to other subjects?

  • English and other Humanities subjects: Literacy and communication
  • Science: Developments in medicine,  healthcare and scientific understanding

What websites or resources may be helpful to support students’ learning?

Exam board information - https://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/history/gcse/history-8145/subject-content/understanding-the-modern-world

KTS GCSE History Quizlet classroom - https://quizlet.com/join/vbD3ZU3HF

There are a variety of revision guides available for the AQA GCSE History course. We would recommend the AQA My Revision Notes version as it covers all four of our units in one book My Revision Notes: AQA GCSE (9-1) History, Second edition: Target success with our proven formula for revision: Amazon.co.uk: Jenner, Tim, Ferriby, David, Beale, Simon, Bones, Carmel, Fletcher, Adele, James, Lizzy: 9781510455610: Books

You can also purchase the Oxford revision guides, which are more detailed, but each unit is covered in a separate book, which is more costly:

USA - Oxford AQA GCSE History (9-1): America 1920-1973: Opportunity and Inequality Revision Guide: With all you need to know for your 2022 assessments : Wilkes, Aaron: Amazon.co.uk: Books

Conflict and Tension - Oxford AQA GCSE History: Conflict and Tension: The Inter-War Years 1918-1939 Revision Guide (9-1): With all you need to know for your 2022 assessments: Amazon.co.uk: Longley, Ellen, Wilkes, Aaron: 9780198422914: Books

Health - Oxford AQA GCSE History: Britain: Health and the People c1000-Present Day Revision Guide (9-1): AQA GCSE HISTORY HEALTH 1000-PRESENT RG: Amazon.co.uk: Wilkes, Aaron: 9780198422952: Books

Elizabeth - Oxford AQA GCSE History: Elizabethan England c1568-1603 Revision Guide (9-1): With all you need to know for your 2022 assessments : Williams, Tim, Wilkes, Aaron: Amazon.co.uk: Books

Please contact Mrs Robertson if you are concerned about the cost of a revision guide for your child.

What extra-curricular or enrichment opportunities are available for students in this subject at this level?

Y10: Battlefields Trip May half term

Y11: Breakfast Club is available

What sort of careers can this subject lead to?

History can lead to a hugely wide range of careers:

  • Law
  • Teaching
  • Museums and art gallery curatorship
  • Research
  • Finance
  • Politics
  • Media and marketing
  • Public relations
  • International relations
  • Journalism

The most traditional route into many of these careers is to undertake a History degree at university, before doing a conversion or post-graduate qualification in a slightly different discipline (a law conversion or a PGCE for example). Having completed a History degree also opens opportunities for accessing internships in areas such as marketing, public relations or journalism

What does student work look like in this subject at this level?

Student work takes a range of forms in GCSE History. Class notes vary hugely in format, from mindmaps, to bullet points, to tables and diagrams and so on. Students are required to regularly self-assess and “audit” their work, to ensure that it is completed to a good standard and includes all of the detail that they need. Students will also regularly complete practice exam questions which will always be completed on templates that include a mark scheme and a bank of feedback comments.

Please follow this link to see examples of exam papers GCSE History assessment resources

How does this subject support a broad and balanced curriculum, meeting the needs of all students, and developing traditional core skills?

As a subject, History provides students with regular opportunities to make links between their learning across different subjects. History allows students to connect their learning about the past with developments and events in the present day, whilst the range of topics covered allows students to take in economic, social, political and religious history across a vast time period, going from the ancient Romans and Greeks up to the present day. Students study a combination of British and wider world History, ensuring that a range of experiences are covered. In terms of developing core skills, History students will regularly utilise and hone their analytical and evaluative skills, through exploring different interpretations of the past and building their contextual knowledge to reach their own judgements and conclusions. Students also regularly complete longer pieces of writing, giving them opportunities to develop essay-writing skills and develop their use of subject specific key terms, whilst also practicing their general spelling, grammar and punctuation. 

How does this subject promote creativity, critical thinking, practice, perseverance and resilience, and making links?

History at KTS includes a range of activities aimed at getting students to utilise their creativity to help them to learn a vast amount of contextual knowledge; students are regularly given a choice of how to complete tasks and record notes, allowing them to create their own resources, whilst students are regularly given opportunities to work collaboratively and create responses as a group. Critical thinking is integral to GCSE History and analytical and evaluative skills are central to answering the exam questions fully. In terms of resilience, students are routinely expected to complete difficult tasks and all students are encouraged to be aspirational and ambitious. As we cover such a huge range of history, from the ancient period to the modern day, students are regularly required to make links between different developments and time periods; for example, when studying Elizabethan England and the technological advances, students make links with their study of Health and the People c. 1000-Present Day.

How does this subject encourage enrichment and the development of cultural capital, deep learning, and inclusivity?

Students cover a huge range of History as part of their GCSE, allowing them to explore a massive range of different topics and developments across a thousand years, allowing them to study a huge array of changes and developments over time. For example, students go from studying feminist movements in America in the 1960s to the discovery of what germs were in the 1860s. As part of GCSE History, students are able to dip into the social, religious, political, cultural and economic changes over time. Students also have the opportunity to take part in a trip to the Battlefields of Belgium and France, enriching their understanding of the Conflict and Tension 1918-1939 course. Whilst the trip is not directly relevant to any exam content, it does give students the chance to appreciate the scale of the damage and destruction caused by WW1 and why this made the major powers so desperate to avoid WW2, which is a central part of the Conflict and Tension course.